ACM/IEEE 16th International Conference on
Model Driven Engineering Languages and Systems

 

Keynote Speakers

The MODELS 2013 Keynotes will feature a distinguished set of speakers who will help to motivate discussion across the days of the conference. Information about the MODELS 2013 Keynote speakers and the abstracts of their talks can be found below.

 

Charles Simonyi

"The Magic of Software"
The PDF of this presentation is available here.

Regency Ballroom
Wednesday, October 2, 2013
8:30am-10:00am

Software allows for many models of computation. We create models to understand and reason about these computations (e.g., did the aircraft change its course because there was a hill in front of it or because a model indicated the presence of a hill?). As computers and software become more and more ubiquitous, the tangible world and computer models of the world are merging. We are re-designing our basic systems from networks, cars and aircrafts, to financial and health systems to reduce their costs and increase their effectiveness using software that, by necessity, must incorporate a model of the environment and its characteristics. Models can also take us outside of this reality and let us explore alternative timelines – what we call simulation. Today, programming languages are the primary way to communicate our intentions of these systems in software. Notation, syntax and semantics make the mental programming language models concrete for us as humans. But the computer does not really need the notation, syntax and semantics models of the software in the same way as we humans do. In this talk, we will trace the magic of software that enabled this progression from Moore’s law, through computer languages, to the Digital Artifacts of today. We will investigate it carefully and come to some surprising conclusions that question the mainstream thinking around software models.  What if we let go of some of our learned beliefs about software models and think differently about models of instructing computers?

Charles Simonyi
Charles Simonyi is a high-tech pioneer, philanthropist and space traveler. He was the chief architect of Microsoft Word, Excel and other widely-used application programs. He left Microsoft to found Intentional Software, which aims to develop and market computer software for knowledge processing. His passion for science and for space has led him to travel into space twice aboard Soyuz spacecraft, becoming the fifth space tourist and the first ever tourist to fly twice.

Dr. Simonyi moved to the United States from Budapest, Hungary in 1968 to attend the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned his B.S. in engineering mathematics. Simonyi went to Stanford to receive his Ph.D. in computer science. He also has honorary doctorates from the University of Pecs in Hungary and from the Julliard School in NY. Beginning in 1972 at Xerox PARC, Simonyi created the first WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) text editor called Bravo. After nearly a decade at Xerox PARC, Simonyi began his work at Microsoft in 1981 as director of application development, chief architect, and distinguished engineer.

 

Constance Heitmeyer

"Model-Based Development of Software Systems:
A Panacea or Academic Poppycock"

Regency Ballroom
Thursday, October 3, 2013
8:30am-10:00am

In recent years, the use of models in developing complex software systems has been steadily increasing.  Advocates of model-based development argue that 1) models can help reduce the time, cost, and effort needed to build software systems which satisfy their requirements and 2) model-based approaches are effective not only in system development but throughout a system's life-time. Thus the problem addressed by researchers in software and system modeling encompasses not only the original construction of a complex system but its complete life-cycle.  This talk will address significant issues in model-based system and software development, including:  What is the current and future role of models in software system development?  What  benefits can we obtain from the use of models not only in development but throughout the system life-cycle?  What are the barriers to using models in software system development and evolution?  What are the major challenges for system and software modeling researchers during the next decade?

Constance Heitmeyer
Constance Heitmeyer heads the Software Engineering Section of the Naval Research Laboratory's Center for High Assurance Computer Systems. Her research focuses on the formal modeling and analysis of critical software systems. 

She has published more than 140 technical papers covering a range of software-related research topics, including requirements specification and validation, verification using model checking and theorem proving, automatic invariant generation, model-based test generation, security modeling, and real-time computing. A frequent invited speaker, Ms. Heitmeyer is the chief designer of NRL's SCR (Software Cost Reduction) toolset, a set of tools for modeling, validating, and verifying complex software systems, which has been transferred to over 200 industry, government, and university groups. One of Ms. Heitmeyer’s major objectives is to transition the results of her research to software practice.  Recently, she led a team which produced model-based evidence demonstrating the security of software implementing an embedded software device; the evidence (formal security model, proofs, demonstration of code-model correspondence) was used in a Common Criteria evaluation supporting U.S. government certification of the device.

 

Bernd Brügge

"Creativity vs Rigor: Informal Modeling is OK"
The PDF of this presentation is available here.

Regency Ballroom
Friday, October 4, 2013
8:30am-10:00am

Single large project courses with clients from industry have been established as capstone courses in many software engineering curricula. They are considered a good way of teaching industry relevant software engineering practices, in particular model-based software development.

One particular challenge is how to balance between modeling and timely delivery. If we focus too much on modeling, the students do not have enough time to deliver the system ("analysis paralysis"). If we focus too much on the delivery of the system, the quality of the models usually goes down the drain. Another challenge is the balance between informal models intended for human communication and specification models intended for CASE tools. I argue that teachers often put too much weight on the rigor of the models, and less  on the creative and iterative aspects of modeling. Modeling should be allowed to be informal,  incomplete and inconsistent, especially during the early phases of software development.

I have been teaching capstone courses for almost 25 years, initially at the senior and junior level. During this time excellent automatic build and release management tools have been developed. They reduce the need for heroic delivery efforts at the end of a course, especially if they are coupled with agile methods, allowing the teacher to spend more time on the creative aspects of modeling. I  will use several examples from my courses to demonstrate how it is possible to include informal modeling techniques in project courses with real customers involving a large number of students at the sophomore and even freshmen level without compromising the ideas of model-driven software development.

Bernd Bruegge


Bernd Brügge is a university professor for computer science at the Technische Universität München (Technical University Munich) with a chair for Applied Software Engineering. In addition, he is an adjunct associate professor at the School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. He received a M.S. and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1982 and 1985, respectively.

He is the recipient of the 1995 Herbert A Simon Award for Excellence in Teaching in Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He co-authored the successful text book "Object-Oriented Software Engineering: Using UML, Patterns and Java," which has been translated in several languages. His research interests include software engineering, usability engineering, agile methodologies, requirements engineering, software architectures, development of smart phones applications and software engineering education. He has developed a teaching methodology that allows 60 and more students to build large scale applications within a single semester and deliver them to a real client.

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